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Women Scientists at NASA in January 1959

January 1959. Women Scientists Lucille Coltrane, Jean Clark Keating, Katherine Cullie Speegle, Doris ‘Dot’ Lee, Ruth Whitman, and Emily Stephens Mueller. via NASA http://ift.tt/2mYY7ri Advertisements

A Mass of Viscous Flow Features

Viscous, lobate flow features are commonly found at the bases of slopes in the mid-latitudes of Mars, and are often associated with gullies. via NASA http://ift.tt/2mBvH63

Technicians Secure the Protective Covering Around CYGNUS.

In the Space Station Processing Facility high bay at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the Orbital ATK CYGNUS pressurized cargo module is secured the KAMAG transporter and the crane has been removed. via NASA http://ift.tt/2lTI4H3

Hubble Showcases a Remarkable Galactic Hybrid

UGC 12591’s classification straddles somewhere between a lenticular and a spiral galaxy. It lies just under 400 million light-years from us in the Pisces–Perseus Supercluster. via NASA http://ift.tt/2mTX87x

Pearl Young at Langley’s Flight Instrumentation Facility, March 1929

In this March 29, 1929 photograph, Pearl I. Young is working in the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory’s Flight Instrumentation Facility (Building 1202). Young was the first woman hired as a technical employee, a physicist at the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics and the second female physicist working for the federal government. via NASA http://ift.tt/2lx2zsi

Full-Circle Vista With a Linear Shaped Martian Sand Dune

The left side of this 360-degree panorama from NASA’s Curiosity Mars rover shows the long rows of ripples on a linear shaped dune in the Bagnold Dune Field on the northwestern flank of Mount Sharp. via NASA http://ift.tt/2mFkfDS

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